TEA releases 2014 accountability ratings
Aug 08, 2014 | 1035 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print

 

TEA releases 2014 accountability ratings
 

 

AUSTIN – The Texas Education Agency today released the 2014 state accountability system ratings for more than 1,200 school districts and charters, and more than 8,500 campuses. The ratings reveal that 90 percent of school districts and charters across Texas have achieved the rating of Met Standard.

Districts, campuses and charters receive one of three ratings under the accountability system: Met StandardMet Alternative Standardor Improvement Required.

School district ratings (including charter operators) by category in 2014 are as follows:

2014 RATING

DISTRICT

CHARTER

TOTAL

PERCENT

Met Standard/Alternative

949

157

1,106

90.1%

Met Standard

949

124

1,073

87.4%

Met Alternative Standard

N/A

33

33

2.7%

Improvement Required

76

35

111

9.0%

Not Rated

0

10

10

0.8%

TOTAL

1,025

202

1,227

100.0%

“Texans should be pleased to see the vast majority of districts, charters, and campuses are meeting the standards set in the second year of the state accountability system,” said Commissioner of Education Michael Williams. “While the 2014 numbers are strong, the work continues in districts across our state to meet and exceed increasing state standards and the expectations of their local communities.”

The 2014 ratings are based on a system that uses various indicators to provide greater detail on the performance of a district or charter and individual campuses throughout the state. The performance index framework includes four areas:

  • Student Achievement – Provides a snapshot of performance across all subjects.
  • Student Progress – Measures year-to-year student progress by subject and student group.
  • Closing Performance Gaps – Tracks advanced academic achievement of economically disadvantaged students and the lowest performing racial/ethnic student groups.
  • Postsecondary Readiness – Emphasizes the importance of earning a high school diploma that provides students with the foundation necessary for success in college, the workforce, job training programs, or the military.

 

In this second year of this accountability system, all four performance indexes include additional measures of academic performance. In addition, Index 4 (Postsecondary Readiness) includes a new measure of postsecondary success based on the percent of graduates who achieve college readiness standards in both English language arts and mathematics.

A district or campus must meet the target on all indexes for which it has performance results. For 2014 only, high schools/K-12 campuses and alternative education campuses and charter districts are not being evaluated on Index 2 (Student Progress) due to the transition to a single reading and writing assessment for English I and English II. In 2013, reading and writing were tested separately.

Under the 2014 state accountability system, campus ratings (including charter campuses) by category and school type are as follows:

2014 RATING

ELEM

MIDDLE

HS

K-12

TOTAL

PERCENT

Met Standard/Alternative

4,112

1,510

1,388

268

7,278

84.9%

Met Standard

4,112

1,503

1,175

246

7,036

82.1%

Met Alternative Standard

0

7

213

22

242

2.8%

Improvement Required

443

143

103

61

750

8.7%

Not Rated

69

53

272

152

546

6.4%

TOTAL

4,624

1,706

1,763

481

8,574

100.0%

Campuses that receive an accountability rating of Met Standard are also eligible for distinction designations. Distinction designations are awarded to campuses based on achievement in several performance indicators relative to a group of 40 campuses of similar type, size, and student demographics. Distinction designations can be earned by campuses in the following areas:

  • Academic Achievement in Reading/English Language Arts;
  • Academic Achievement in Mathematics;
  • Academic Achievement in Science;
  • Academic Achievement in Social Studies;
  • Top 25 Percent: Student Progress;
  • Top 25 Percent: Closing Performance Gaps; and
  • Postsecondary Readiness.

 

More than 4,400 campuses that achieved the Met Standard rating earned some type of distinction designation. Four hundred campuses earned a distinction designation in all of the distinction categories that were evaluated for the campus. A complete listing of these districts can be found on the Texas Education Agency website.

“Earning a distinction is not easy,” said Commissioner Williams. “Any school earning one or more distinctions should be recognized in its community for the outstanding work taking place on that campus.”

In addition, districts and charters are eligible to receive a distinction designation for postsecondary readiness. Postsecondary readiness is the only distinction at the district level. Twenty-six school districts and charters earning this distinction for 2014. Districts and charters earning a postsecondary readiness distinction include: Carroll ISD; Cisco ISD; Clifton ISD; Falls City ISD; Fort Worth Academy of Fine Arts; Glasscock County ISD; Glen Rose ISD; Gruver ISD; Harmony School of Science (Houston); Harmony Science Academy (Waco); Highland Park ISD (Dallas); Hurst-Euless-Bedford ISD; Kerrville ISD; Los Fresnos CISD; Lovejoy ISD; Martins Mill ISD; Medina Valley ISD; Mumford ISD; Richardson ISD; School of Science and Technology (Leon Valley); Sharyland ISD; South Texas ISD; Uplift Education-North Hills Preparatory (Irving); Uplift Education-Williams Preparatory (Dallas); Valley View ISD; and Wimberley ISD.

The 2014 ratings – with the additional measures for academic performance – remained fairly stable compared to 2013. In 2014, 90.1 percent of districts received an initial rating of Met Standard/Met Alternative Standard (compared to 92.5 percent in 2013) and nine percent received an initial rating of Improvement Required (compared to 6.5 percent in 2013). In 2014, 84.9 percent of campuses received an initial rating of Met Standard/Met Alternative Standard (compared to 84.2 percent in 2013) and 8.7 percent received an initial rating of Improvement Required (compared to 9.1 percent in 2013). Districts, charters and campuses can appeal a rating. All ratings are final in October.

Educators, school board members, business and community representatives, professional organizations, and legislative representatives from across the state provided assistance and advice to the Texas Education Agency during development of the current accountability system.

Independent of the state’s accountability system, House Bill 5 (passed last year by the 83rd Texas Legislature) requires all school districts to evaluate the district’s performance and the performance of each campus in regard to community and student engagement. Although these locally-assigned ratings must be posted on district websites beginning Aug. 8 (coinciding with the release of state ratings), they are separate from the state accountability ratings.

The Texas Education Agency will post the state-assigned academic and financial ratings, as well as the locally-determined community and student engagement ratings, on the agency’s website by Oct. 1.

To assist parents and the general public, the Texas Education Agency has produced a video that offers a quick overview of the State Accountability System and what goes into the annual ratings of schools, districts and charters. The video can be viewed at: http://youtu.be/cbEgrdijuc8.

To view the 2014 state accountability ratings for districts, charters and campuses (plus distinction designations earned at the campus and district level), visit the Texas Education Agency website athttp://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/perfreport/account/2014/index.html.

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