NATIVE AMERICAN BEADWORK SEMINAR
May 13, 2014 | 1016 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The Museum of the Red River presents a Native American Beadwork Seminar led by nationally-renowned bead artist David Dean. This seminar will provide the basics of Native American beadwork and give bead workers the tools needed to produce Native American style beadwork that is common among most Native tribes of North America.

Items to be discussed include how to buy beads and supplies, basic instruction in four different and unique bead working techniques, history of how techniques are used and their purpose, how to age beadwork, and the significance of each technique in the development of beadwork styles on the North American continent. Many tribal differences will be explained as well as the use of the various techniques.

David is among the prominent bead artists in North America, specializing in Native American beadwork. He produces his art using a variety of stitches and techniques. He has been invited to teach beadwork by museums, bead societies and jewelry making venues throughout the United States, including such prestigious venues as the Chicago Bead Museum and Bead Society of Washington, D.C. He has authored several books on beadwork and been featured in other publications because of his specialized artistry. David grew up around the pow-wow circle and continues, along with his family, to participate in pow-wows across the country.

This Seminar will be held at the Museum of the Red River, 812 E. Lincoln Road, Idabel, Oklahoma on May 23-24, 2014, from 9:00 am – 12:00 pm and 1:30 pm – 4:30 pm. Students for this event can come to one or all four sessions of the seminar. The cost is $45 for all four sessions; each session teaches a different technique and is optional. Each session will require sample “kit” and can be purchased for $5 at time of registration. Additional supplies will be available for purchase. The Friday evening lecture is FREE and will be held at 7 pm. Please call the Museum at 580-286-3616 to reserve your spot or for more information.

Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet