Tefteller home to be on HUM tour
by MARY L. KIRBY
May 05, 2014 | 1182 views | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Mirror Photo / Mary Laschinger Kirby <br>
REGINA TEFTELLER, left, takes a break in the living room with her children, Bonnie, center, and Crockett. Her husband, Jarom Tefteller, is the third attorney to own the yellow house at 803 N. Montgomery, and the couple did extensive changes and refurbishing of the house before moving in December, 2007. That included adding crown molding and baseboards in most rooms, refinishing the wood floors, and creating additional cabinets in the kitchen to match the original built in designs.
Mirror Photo / Mary Laschinger Kirby
REGINA TEFTELLER, left, takes a break in the living room with her children, Bonnie, center, and Crockett. Her husband, Jarom Tefteller, is the third attorney to own the yellow house at 803 N. Montgomery, and the couple did extensive changes and refurbishing of the house before moving in December, 2007. That included adding crown molding and baseboards in most rooms, refinishing the wood floors, and creating additional cabinets in the kitchen to match the original built in designs.
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EDITOR'S NOTE: Three lines of this story were inadvertently cut off at the bottom of the page on which it appeared in the print edition version of The Mirror on May 3, 2014. Here, though, is the story in its entirety. We apologize for the miscue which occurred in the print edition. Also, only an abbreviated version of Mary L. Kirby's story was in the print edition. What follows is the complete article.



The third home on the Historic Upshur Museum’s 4th Annual Heritage Tour of Homes belongs to Jarom and Regina Tefteller at 803 N. Montgomery St.

Tickets to the tour are available at the Historic Upshur Museum for $10 and will be available at the door of each home. The other two homes are Marie Bennett’s at 203 E. Butler and Bill and Loring Marshall at 800 W. Tyler.

The tour is from 2 to 4 p.m. on Sunday, May 4.

Tickets at $1 are also available for a raffle for an overnight stay at Oaklea Manor House in Winnsboro. The raffle will be held at the end of the tour.

They are the third owners of the yellow brick home in the Mitchell Addition which was built by T.D. Ray in the 1930s. He was an attorney as was Judge Looney Lindsey, the second owner, and Jarom Tefteller, the current resident.

It was 1954 when Judge Lindsey and his wife, Cynthia Faye acquired the home. His wife was a high school counselor for many years.

All of the furnishing In this home is new to the couple and to the home, bought after they finished refurbishing the house during the fall of 2007 while they lived with Todd and JoEllen Tefteller.

First they stripped out the wall-to-wall carpet and sanded down the hardwood floors.

In two rooms, window air conditioning units had damaged the floors so further work was done to get all ship shape.

Robert Hall Jr., Regina’s father, offered an essential helping hand, because he created the crown molding seen in most of the rooms of the house, most especially the living and dining rooms.

He also created a cabinet for the east side of the kitchen which matches the built-in shelving and counters in the rest of the room and the granite countertops for the kitchen. The porcelain double sink remains from the Lindsey kitchen.

Once the couple settled on a central island in the kitchen, the breakfast nook seemed redundant. Instead they opted for more cabinets and counter top.

Hall measured the space numerous times and the constructed the cabinet at his home in Copperas Cove where he refurbishes helicopters returned from Iraq for the U.S. Army. It came in one piece to the house and was added one weekend during the fall of 2007.

Regina’s father worked in the motor pool and was a First Sergeant when he met Erika, Regina’s mother. He retired a Master Sergeant at Fort Hood, which is what brought the Hall family to Texas.

Jarom and Regina met as students at the University of Texas, Austin.

While preparing the home for the couple, one week end, in a 25-hour period from 7 a.m. Saturday to 7:30 a.m. Sunday, Jarom, Regina, her father, and her brother, Mark Hall, Jarom’s mother, JoEllen Tefteller, and others installed all the crown and base molding.

In addition four columns were installed in the openings between the living and dining rooms as the white of the columns and molding counter balance the dark woods selected for the dining room and master bedroom furniture.

Wainscoting in the dining room helps lighten the room from being too heavy with its deep red walls, dark dining table and china cabinet, and floors. Wainscoting is also found in Bonnie’s room, the front bedroom, and Crockett’s bedroom in the back of the house.

Over the dining room table hangs a crystal chandelier which was original to the room. Mrs. Lindsey had modified it to suit her needs, but Regina found the original crystal pieces and returned it to its former state.

The couple’s Contrella China by Nortaki fills the cabinet in the dining room. Several pieces of cut glass, gifts from Linda Kay Dean, and Bunnykins China for Bonnie and Crockett also are house there.

Son Crockett will be four in June while daughter Bonnie is two.

In the kitchen hangs a chandelier which had been in another room of the house but like the stainglass windows in the front is original to the house.

The living room, the master bedroom, and the hallway joining all the bedrooms and the family room are painted light brown with the white molding. Down one side of the hallway is a grouping of family photos with the Teftellers to the left and the Halls to the right flanking an account of the family’s past.

Facing the family history are three scenes from the San Diego Mission made during the couple’s honeymoon in San Diego.

Two posters of works by Ansel Adams grace the family room. Otherwise, photos of a growing family fill the walls of the home.

Bonnie’s bedroom is a bright sunny yellow and filled with stuffed animals and the toys of a growing child. The furnishings are in the matching dark brown to the master suite.

Crockett’s room is in medium and light blue with lots of stuffed animals and two very special gifts. When Crockett was two, his grandfather Hall gave him a set of blocks of various sizes fitted in their own cabinet.

The next year, Grandfather Hall created an easel fill with things to open and pull, doors, cabinet pulls and other items to develop the skills of a growing boy.

The bathroom adjoining Crockett’s room has its original pink tile and appointments, while the master bath has blue tile and appointments.

A glance at Superman sheets on the bed and a Longhorn pennant over his head, and one knows two things which inspire a young man’s thoughts.

From the ceiling hangs a model of a British Spitfire of World War II vintage which was built from scratch by his great-grandfather, Robert Hall Sr., just the thing to keep a young man’s thoughts soaring.

A labor of love, the Tefteller home is filled with a blend of old and new, a joyful example of how to adapt old spaces to young, new lives together.

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