Sideglances
by SARAH GREENE
Oct 05, 2013 | 789 views | 0 0 comments | 16 16 recommendations | email to a friend | print
QUOTING myself, never a very good idea, I once wrote about how useful proverbs can be. As follows:

“Traditionally listed as a part of the major branch of philosophy known as metaphysics, ontology deals with questions concerning what entities exist or can be said to exist, and how such entities can be grouped, related within a hierarchy, and subdivided according to similarities and differences.

“People who never heard of metaphysics can obtain the basic rules of living from proverbs and folk sayings.”

Living at present at Wesley House in the south part of Gilmer, I felt the time was auspicious to search out some more of these “basic rules of living.”

HERE ARE SOME:

A big wife and a big barn, will never do a man any harm.

A clean conscience makes a soft pillow.

A merry companion is music on a journey.

A poor excuse is better than none at all.

A wife that does not know how to keep house throws out more with a teaspoon than a man can bring in with a shovel.

A little too late is much too late.

A good deed is never lost.

A smile is worth a thousand words.

A person who gets all wrapped up in himself makes a mighty small package.

A false friend and a shadow stay only while the sun shines.

All is fair in love and war, but friendship there is truth.

A word of praise is equal to ointment on a sore.

A chain is as strong as its weakest link.

A clock will run without watching it.

A man is judged by the company he keeps.

A tree is known by its fruit, not by its leaves.

A guilty conscience needs no accuser.

A false friend is worse than an open enemy.

Anytime means no time.

Every donkey thinks itself worthy of standing with the king.

Even the devil was an angel in the beginning.

Envy is the sincerest form of flattery.

Figures, never lie, but liars can figure.

He who laughs last, laughs longest.

Honest doubt is better than pious fraud.

If you come to the end of your rope -- tie a knot in it and hang on.

It is better to bend than break.

If wishes were horses, then beggars would ride

If you wish another to keep your secret, keep it first yourself.

Liberty, like charity, must begin at home.

Obstinacy is the strength of the weak.

Poets and pigs are appreciated only after their death.

Rest is sweet when one has earned it.

Sickness comes in haste and goes at leisure.

Some people have tact, others tell the truth.

Speak the truth and shame the devil.

The person who thinks too little usually talks too much

To act is easy to think is hard.

Trouble comes when the New Year’s resolutions collide with the old year’s habits.

Victory belongs to the most persevering.

We shall be judged not by what we might have done, but by what we have been.

When the well is dry, you know the worth of water.

When one has seen the bear in the woods, he hears his growl in every bush.

SO MUCH judgment. I’m really glad I never saw a bear in the woods.
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