Senate Universal Service Fund Bill Discriminates Against Rural Texans
Mar 26, 2013 | 710 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print

Senate Universal Service Fund Bill Discriminates Against Rural Texans – For No Other Reason Than Where They Live

 

AUSTIN, Texas (March 26, 2013) – Scott Stringer, director of government and regulatory affairs for CenturyLink Texas, today issued the following statement after the Senate Business and Commerce Committee took no action on a committee substitute to Senate Bill 583 that would restructure the state's Universal Service Fund:

 

“While the committee substitute to Senate Bill 583 remains a work in progress, Keep Texas Connected is concerned that hundreds of thousands of rural Texans will pay much higher telephone and Internet bills or lose their service altogether under the bill as written.

 

“The committee substitute redlines rural Texans based solely on where they live. One rural Texans’ telephone and Internet service should not be less reliable, or more expensive, than his neighbor’s simply because of the name of the telephone company that provides the service.

 

“It’s important the Senate Business and Commerce Committee members get this problem fixed. Every rural Texan deserves reliable and affordable landline telephone and Internet service – regardless of where they live or work.”

 

Editor’s Note: Keep Texas Connected is not affiliated with Connected Nation, Inc. nor with the program Connected Texas.

 

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About Keep Texas Connected

Through statewide collaboration with key stakeholders, Keep Texas Connected is an alliance of local government officials, emergency first responders, educational institutions, healthcare providers, industry leaders and private citizens who are dedicated to ensuring that every Texan has access to an affordable, reliable, and high-quality telecommunications network. For more information, visit the coalition Web site at www.keeptexasconnected.org.

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