The Boston Massacre
by JAMES STILL
Jan 31, 2014 | 1994 views | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print

The Boston Massacre – Feb 2014

Following the Boston Massacre and subsequent trial, Samuel Adams wrote an article for theBoston Gazette:  “As the lives of five of his Majesty’s subjects were unfairly lost on the evening of the 5th of March last, it follows that some persons must have been in fault…  But in times when politics run high, we find by the experience of past ages, it is difficult to ascertain the truth even in a court of law…

… at present there are good grounds to apprehend a settled design to enslave and ruin the colonies; and that some men of figure and station in America, have adopted the plan, and would gladly lull the people to sleep…  The true patriot therefore, will enquire into the causes of the fears and jealousies [suspicions] of his countrymen; and if he finds they are not groundless…  He will, as far as he is able, keep the attention of his fellow citizens awake to their grievances; and not suffer them to be at rest, till the causes of their just complaints are removed.

… the true patriot, will constantly be jealous [suspicious] of [government officials]: Knowing that power, especially in times of corruption, makes men wanton; that it intoxicates the mind; and unless those with whom it is entrusted are carefully watched… they will be apt to domineer over the people instead of governing them…  If he finds, upon the best enquiry, the want of ability or integrity; that is, an ignorance of, or a disposition to depart from the constitution… he will point them out and loudly proclaim them:  He will stir up the people, incessantly to complain of such men, till they are either reformed, or removed from that sacred trust, which it is dangerous for them any longer to hold.”  Samuel Adams

James Still, JamesStill@RetraceOurSteps.com

 “To violate the laws of the state is a capital crime; and if those guilty of it are invested with authority, they add to this crime, a perfidious [treacherous] abuse of the power with which they are entrusted…” Samuel AdamsBoston Gazette, January 21, 1771-- 
"The fears and jealousies [suspicions] of the people are not always groundless..."  Samuel Adams, Boston Gazette, January 21, 1771
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