In Austin Fiber Wars, the Little Guy Beats Google and AT&T to the Punch
by ANDREW HUYGEN
Feb 23, 2014 | 885 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print

In Austin Fiber Wars, the Little Guy Beats Google and AT&T to the Punch

An arms race is afoot to deliver high speed Internet to Austin.

An arms race is afoot to deliver high speed Internet to Austin. Photo by flickr.com/rutlo.

By Andrew Huygen

For KUT and Reporting Texas

Another competitor is joining the fiber arms race in Austin.

San Marcos-based Grande Communications says it will begin rolling out its own super-fast Internet service – offering speeds up to 20 times faster than existing top-tier service – in select Austin neighborhoods starting next week. The service, which Grande is calling Power 1000, would cost $65 per month, with no contract or activity monitoring.

The new connection would offer Internet speeds of 1 gigabit per second, allowing a user to download a full-length film in about 10 seconds. The fastest speed offered by most providers is 50 megabits per second. AT&T and Google Fiber are both rolling out gigabit service in Austin this year.

 

Read more: In Austin Fiber Wars, the Little Guy Beats Google and AT&T to the Punch

 

 

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Welcome to Reporting Texas, a digital media initiative from the School of Journalism at the University of Texas at Austin. Reporting Texas accepts submissions from undergraduate and graduate students throughout the university, promoting engagement in the digital age of journalism.

Supported by a grant from the Carnegie Corporation of New York and its Initiative on the Future of Journalism Education, Reporting Texas serves four primary goals: To showcase the best work of our University of Texas at Austin undergraduate and graduate students; to offer quality, multimedia reporting to local, state, and national news outlets; to experiment with new approaches in journalism education; and to combine aspects of community reporting with multimedia resources.

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Reporting Texas supports young journalists by fostering an ethical and creative environment for graduate and undergraduate students at the University of Texas to report the news and thereby shed light on our community and our world. Our mission is supported by a grant from the Carnegie Corporation of New York and its Initiative on the Future of Journalism Education. Reporting Texas represents a wealth of disciplines, and all students are invited to present their ideas to our editorial staff, who review and edit all submissions. We welcome reporting through traditional and novel approaches, including text, photos, slideshows, sound slides, videos and mixed media. We emphasize reporting that focuses on untold stories.

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